Sunday, September 30, 2007

R.I.P.

Word comes from Victoria, Texas, that my mother, Novella Dean Crisp, has died.

This was no surprise. Her health had been slowly declining for some time, then much more rapidly in recent weeks. Word from two of my brothers last week was that it could be a couple of days or a couple of weeks.

Despite her best efforts, she never had much much luck at getting me to believe in Heaven. But she did believe, and if there is consolation, it is in knowing that if she was right and I am wrong (which is usually how it worked out) then she will be there, wondering what's keeping the rest of us. I rack up a longer list of sins in putting out a single issue of The Outpost than she did in an average decade. If she ever took a drink, told a lie, cheated a soul, uttered a foul word or did a mean deed, I never heard about it. And I wouldn't have believed it if I had heard.

She worked hard. May she rest well.

UPDATE: Thanks for all of the kind words in comments. Here is the obituary.

15 comments:

craig said...

Deepest condolences, David.

Anonymous said...

Dave,

You have my deepest condolences. That's a tough one, amigo. I will keep you and your family in my prayers.

LK

pjfinn said...

There's little that can be said at a time like this. Though you don't know me, I hope you will accept my condolences.

moos said...

So sorry, David. I hope that you have many good memories of your mother. My mom was always right, too.

Anonymous said...

David, you and your family have my deepest sympathies. I am sorry for your loss.

Shane C. Mason said...

My thoughts are with you Dave.

Anonymous said...

We at 4&20 Blackbirds send our deepest condolences.

Victoria-area reader said...

You have all my sympathy.

jcurmudge said...

My kids (all 7 of them) lost their mother quickly to leukemia a couple of years ago. I shared there pain again when their brother died last Summer. And I share with you your fond remembrances as I believe mother and son are indeed together in heaven. Be blest, my friend.

Jim Taylor

writer said...

Texas women are a tough breed, I'm sure she had a welcome in her Heaven Mr. Crisp (and when you get there, she is going to have a word or two for you!)
Take care and thoughts are with ya...

Matt Singer said...

David,

If she raised someone as wise and humble as you, she must have been an amazing woman.

If she is looking down, I'm sure your eulogy means a lot.

May she Rest in Peace.

6 Generations said...

I just read your latest post, David, and am sorry to hear of your family's loss. From your description of your mother's health, you clearly were expecting the news. However, having recently lost a beloved grandmother, 96 years old, I know that "expecting" is not the same as "accepting." I was surprised at the intensity of my own grief though I knew my grandmother had lived a long, fruitful, and healthy life. It was the knowledge of her absence in this world that hit me. She, also, believed in heaven. All my sympathy--

Chuck Rightmire said...

David: I share the thoughts of others who have posted here. No matter age or health, the death of a loved one always leaves a hole in our hearts and minds that never fills up. I lost my parents a number of years ago, but I still think of them almost every day. It helps with the healing.

Anonymous said...

Permit me to add my deepest sympathies as well. My mother passed away nine years ago after a 25-year struggle with cancer. It was an annual thing, her having an operation to cut out the offending cancer -- first from the throat, then from the sinuses, breast and some other places; when the doctor said it had gotten to her lungs, she said enough and went into hospice.

When she died, she weighed 75 pounds. It was a good thing I was in Arizona -- I doubt I could have handled it very well.

Anyway, Pauline Dooley was a saint. She had to be, to put up with my Dad and me.

May your mother Rest in Peace. (And maybe she'll prove you incorrect and you'll meet her again, some day.)

Kirk Dooley, Mesa, AZ

Mark T said...

My deepest sympathies David - we never truly become adults until we lose our parents. Welcome aboard.

We were talking to my mother, who is 90, and she talked about going to heaven ... we all assume that if there is such a place, she will be there. But, she reminded us, if she does manage to make it there, it will be in a very low place?

Why so low, we ask her?

"The swearing", she says.

Hope your Mom didn't swear.