Sunday, August 13, 2006

So long

Congratulations, Wal-Mart shoppers. You bagged another one.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Uh! Excuse me David but, County Market like Smith's and Buttrey's as well as Albertson's has had the same opportunity to sell at "reasonable" prices. Smith's had been gouging Heights customers for years until Wal Mart opened, and I discovered that their orange juice, as an example, was $3.00 less a gallon than the identical product at Smith's! Do you expect shoppers to support a store that gouges to that degree when an alternative is available? If Cenex were to begin selling gas at $1.50 a gallon, would you expect we consumers to continue to buy gas at Exxon/Mobile at $3.00 a gallon to keep them in business? I get tired of the constant Wal Mart bashing. America is and always has been a competitive nation. Did Henry Ford worry about putting buggy makers out of business? But, I've said it before and I'll say it again, if you want to blame anyone for Wal Mart's success, buy a ballbat and stand outside and bash the customers coming out. They and their incomes determine what they want to spend. And, by the way, you can buy that bat for $5.00 less at Wal Mart than most of the Sporting goods stores in town. But, if you're affluent enough to afford to pay much more, go support the stores charging higher prices. And finally, as far as foriegn made goods being sold at Wall Mart cheaper than other stores, try and find one that doesn't sell shirts made in China or Bangladesh, at twice the price. P.S. I am not a Wal Mart employee or stockholder.

Shane C. Mason said...

Anonymous,

When local stores lose 'volume' of customers to Wal Mart they have to raise prices. When small stores begin to close down, Wal Mart will raise their prices. It always happens.

Did Henry Ford worry about putting buggy makers out of business?

No, what Henry For d did was to pay his employees a resonable wage. He felt like the best way for him to be profitable was for the workers at his company to be able to purchase his product. In other words, he strove to create a middle class base. That is not Wal Mart's aim.

Chuck Rightmire said...

Sorry, anonymous, but you're paying for lower quality at wally's world and they achieve the lower prices (which aren't really that low for the quality) by sandbagging the suppliers. Depend on anything but name brands you buy there to be short term.

Pete Hansen said...

The first comment on this issue was mine. I don't know why it came up as "ananymous" since I always use my name and did so on that comment. And Shane, the incident over the orange juice I cited was after Wal Mart had opened. I had been shopping at Smiths for a number of years and, their price was always the same. Only after Wal Mart opened did it also open many people's eyes as to how they'd been gouged for so many years. And, as far as Henry Ford goes,I'm sure he didn;t wring his hands or ofer severence pay to the thousand of buggy builders, buggy whip makers, harness makers, wheelwrights etc. He came up with a product, marketed it and became a success, just like Sam Walton did. And, I'mn sure he wasn't totally motivated by benevolence for the middle class. And, with all the hand wringing, Wal Mart is one of, if not the largest employer in the world (probably second only to our government). If not for them, millions wouldn't have any employment at all! And, for Chuck, many people can't afford "name brands." And in so far as "suppliers go, no one is forcing them to deal with Wal Mart and, if it's such a raw deal, then why are companies by the thousand standing in line to sell their products to and, become a supplier to Wal Mart. Don't you see anything wrong with those complaints?

Paul Whiting said...

Here's the experience of a small business owner in a neighboring state, when WalMart came to their town: http://www.alternet.org/workplace/32094/

Herb said...

David, Michael Lyon on KBLG reported County Market's corporation, Tidyman, is going out of business because of the millions of dollars they have to pay in a sexual discrimination lawsuit. If he's right, then Wal-Mart and its shoppers are not to blame. Do you have conflicting information to support your accusation?

Chuck Rightmire said...

And so, Pete, people who can't afford the name brands, even at wally's world, will get ripped off with the low-quality work that the company's intensive drive to get lower prices for its suppliers forces those suppliers to provide?

Pete Hansen said...

To Chuck:
Have you attempted or contemplated purchasing any "name brand' merchandise lately? Like "Made in America?" In clothing, the button holes aren't sewn without a lot of thread hanging off. The sizes do not match the labels. Most shrik with the first washing as to become 1/2 to a full size smaller. And, while I'll buy American when I can (or can afford it), my money doesn't come any easier to me than it probably does to you. I had this discussion about 20 years ago when I was considered a traitor for buying a Honda Civic. Why? Because I refused to support American workers and companies by spending my hard earned money on American crap like a Chevy Vega or Ford Pinto! And, while I have been a union organizer and steward and helped form and supported unions, in my opinion, their's is just one of the reasons for the changes in the world. A good idea when they were originally conceived, but, in flexing their muscles and demanding more of everything, have priced themselves and the products they represent, out of business. I frequently use the example of autoworkers who could afford to take Mondays and Fridays off because of their union demanded pay, while the company paid them $24 an hour (back in the old days. I'm sure, as technology became available, the company Bean Counters asked, "Why are we paying a guy $24 an hour plus medical benefits, retirement and overtime for screwing lig nuts on a car on the assemply line, when we can buy a robot that can do it 24/7 and we'd ammortize our purchasing cost in less than a year? And, all we need is a couple of mechanics and an occasional oiling to keep it running." My wife worked at a Wall Mart for a time and started ot $7.50 and, after 10 months, was at $8.75 with medical benefits, profit sharing and stock options. Unfortunately, not everyone in this world seeking employment can start out as a CEO or a Bill Gates. Tough to swallow, I know but, the real world none the less. And, I read the article about the woman and her printing business and take it with a gain of salt. First, what does someone running into her with a grocery cart have to do with anything? Second, the greeters at the Heights store are pleasant and, many being elderly, are happy to be able to have employment of any kind! Third, she wrings her hands over stuff that may or may not happen. Seems the sport of choice these days is to kick and bitch about anyone or anything that's a success or, more successful than they are. Could that be why America is so hated around the world?

David said...

Herb,
Look at the last paragraph of the story.

Chuck Rightmire said...

Well, Pete, my experience with wally's shirts has been exactly what you reported: the first washing they shrink two sizes. I haven't had that experience with similar shirts bought at K-Mart, for example, for about the same price or at Penneys (notice, I don't iinsist on made in America or even pay much attention to where they are made). I don't like the ripoff that wally's world puts on consumers or on the makers of goods to cut corners. And the demise of unions explains why our country is losing its middle class and why we have to buy cheap, shoddy merchandise to make ends meet.

Gman said...

The sky is falling, the sky is falling!!!!