Tuesday, August 07, 2007

Backup

Aren't they transferring the wrong guy? Seems to me that failing to back up a fellow officer, whether you like him or not, would be extremely dangerous and a firing offense.

To me, if you have a left fielder who won't back up throws to third base because he doesn't like the third baseman, you get rid of the outfielder, not the infielder.

8 comments:

Eric said...

You didn't really expect him to go back to his job, like nothing happened, did you?

Why do you think the jury awarded him $1,300,000?

His career with the Billings PD will end the day he gets the money if he's wise.

Anonymous said...

If he's wise he'll stay employed and invest the 1.3M in a balanced portfolio.

Jim Larson said...

It sounds as if he already has grounds for another discrimination suit.

Anonymous said...

David pretty much nailed it. Why is the Cop who threw the fit still employed by the City?

Eric said...

I don't think so Jim - his employer took steps to insure his well-being when they transferred him.

Anonymous said...

Don't forget the variations of truth here, the chief and deputy chief are giving different versions of "the story." No heads roll, so someone must know something on someone. Don't we have a name for that?

Anonymous said...

Many officers don't get back up. It's not because they don't want to back him up, there isn't always an available officer to do it. I feel for his supervisors. Afraid of making any decision that might anger him, and start another lawsuit...

Anonymous said...

The lawsuit is a problem that didn't have to happen. Failed leadership brought it on, and failed leadership continues the situation. The plaintiff's attorney hoped we'd finally get integrity down here. Guess not.